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January 31, 2008

NORML: University of Wisconsin Researchers find cannabinoids fight cancers!

Posted by Gary Storck
Thursday, January 31, 2008

While AB 550, The Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act awaits its fate in the Assembly Health and Healthcare Reform Committee where the chairwoman, Rep. Leah Vukmir (R-Wauwatosa) refuses to allow a public hearing, researchers at the University of WI are finding cannabinoids are potent anti-cancer weapons!

This item from NORML's Weekly News tells more about this research:

US Investigators Praise Cannabinoids As Chemo Treatment

Madison, WI: Cannabinoids inhibit cancer cell proliferation and should be clinically tested as chemotherapeutic agents, according to a review published in the January issue of the journal Cancer Research.

Investigators at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health reported that the administration of cannabinoids halts the spread of a wide range of cancers, including brain cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, skin cancer, pancreatic cancer, and lymphoma. Researchers suggested that cannabinoids may offer significant advantages over standard chemotherapy treatments because the compounds are both non-toxic and can uniquely target malignant cells while ignoring healthy ones.

"Cannabinoids … offer potential applications as anti-tumor drugs, based on the ability of some members of this class to limit inflammation, cell proliferation, and cell survival," authors concluded. "[T]here is overwhelming evidence to suggest that cannabinoids can be explored as chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer."

In November, researchers at the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute reported that the administration of the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol limits the activity of the breast cancer metastasis gene Id-1, stating, "[Cannabidiol] offers hope of a non-toxic therapy that could [treat aggressive forms of cancer] without any of the painful side effects [of chemotherapy.]"

In 2006, investigators at Madrid's Complutense University, School of Biology, reported in the British Journal of Cancer that THC administration decreases recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (brain) tumor growth in patients diagnosed with the disease.

NORML Deputy Director Paul Armentano praised the University of Wisconsin study. "Far from being cancer causing agents, cannabinoids may one day represent a new class of non-toxic anti-cancer drugs that can halt the spread of the disease without inducing the painful and life-threatening side effects of chemotherapy," he said.

For more information, please contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, "Cannabinoids for cancer treatment: progress and promise," appears in Cancer Research. Additional information on the use of cannabinoids as potential anti-cancer agents is available in the online report "Cannabinoids as Cancer Hope" at: http://norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=6814.

Posted by Gary at 06:26 PM | Comments (0)

January 30, 2008

What does Rep. Leah Vukmiir have against cancer and MS patients and nursing Moms?

Posted by Gary Storck
Wednesday, January 30, 2008

Even a bill the State Senate passed protecting nursing mothers from harassment is stuck and facing death in Rep. Leah Vukmir's committee, just like AB 550, the Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act. Might Vukmir be Wisconsin's meanest state legislator?

From the Jan. 30, 2008 editions of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Do what's best for babies
click here
By Jennifer L.W. Fink

(snip)

But the Right to Breast-feed Act, which allows women to breast-feed anywhere they and their children are otherwise authorized to be and includes a $200 penalty for anyone who harasses the breast-feeding mother, has not yet become law. It passed the Senate last spring but stalled in the Assembly. It's currently languishing before the Assembly Committee on Health and Healthcare Reform, chaired by Rep. Leah Vukmir (R-Wauwatosa). A representative from Risser's office told me, "There's not a lot of expectation of action." (Vukmir did not return my calls.)


Posted by Gary at 10:57 PM | Comments (0)

January 24, 2008

"Allow Life with Dignity" -- WI medical cannabis patients vigil at State of State Address

Posted by Gary Storck
Thursday, January 24, 2008

Close to a dozen medical cannabis patients and supporters from the Madison area, the Milwaukee area, as well as Eau Claire and Mondovi, had a successful State of State Patients vigil at Gov. Jim Doyle's State of the State Address Wed. night.

Lakeside Press of Madison did a fantastic job creating and printing our signs from slogans and images we provided. Special thanks to Ralph. Slogans included, "Pass AB 550, The Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act", "The State of State Patients is not Good! Pass AB 550", "Allow Life with Dignity", "Some patients won't have a next session" and "Wisconsin Nurses Association supports AB 550".

Snowy road conditions delayed the arrival of Jacki Rickert, but she was still able to make it in time to talk to various legislators and media afterward. WORT Madison Community Radio did a live report with myself and an MS patient from Milwaukee, Brian, on their 6:30 news. Our signage was backdrop for tv shots.

Rep. Gene Hahn (R-Cambria), who is not seeking reelection this fall, told me and Ben Masel that AB 146, the hemp study committee bill he sponsored, was unlikely to get a floor vote this session, despite passing committee unanimously. Many bills are facing similar fates due to the few days remaining that the Assembly is scheduled to be in session.

Speaking of bills stalled in the process, medical cannabis arch-opponent/Health and Healthcare Reform committee chairwoman Rep. Leah Vukmir (R-Wauwatosa) spotted us and our signs and exchanged glances with supporters on the way in, then apparently slipped out a back exit after the speech. Jacki was hoping to for a moment to personally ask Rep. Vukmir, a nurse, why she would refuse to even hold a hearing on a bill that is so critical to the health of patients who have run out of legal options. One can understand why Rep. Vukmir would not want to see the faces of the victims of her lawblocking.

All in all, a very visible presence for medical cannabis supporters. Afterward, one of our party, cancer/AIDS patient Mary P., who uses a wheelchair, was having a cigarette outside the E. Washington entrance to the Capitol when Gov. Doyle and his entourage approached after exiting the Capitol following the speech. Mary said she had several minutes of face time with the governor, making a plea for patients like herself fighting each day for a quality of life, and reminding him he had said he would sign a bill.

The final word is that the state of state patients remains poor, and with the Vukmir blockade in place and the Assembly likely to have only a few more in session days before business ends on March 13, AB 550, the Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act, is unlikely to progress out of committee this session, like prior bills dating back to 1993. 1993 was also the year Republicans gained control of the Assembly. While there have been a few defectors over the years from the GOP leadership's ideology of keeping patients in pain, most caucus members quietly go along. The leadership makes it easy for them to avoid electoral consequences by making sure no votes are ever scheduled. That way, no one can say they voted against it.

The GOP lock on the Assembly -- now down to just three seats -- has left patients forcing to choose between a law and a quality of life, if they can even find cannabis. There is no guarantee that a Democratic controlled Assembly would embrace medical cannabis legislation, but it certainly would be a lot friendlier than the likes of people like Mike Huebsch, John Gard, Scott Jensen, and preceding GOP Assembly Speakers who have all made the ultimate decision to make medical marijuana bills die without a vote, despite overwhelming public support.

Posted by Gary at 11:06 AM | Comments (0)

January 20, 2008

Shepherd Express: Remembering Dreyfus

Posted by Gary Storck
Sunday, January 20, 2008

Here's a piece from last week's issue of Milwaukee's Shepherd Express about the passing of former WI Gov. Lee Sherman Dreyfus and his link to medical cannabis, with a nice update on AB 550.

Source: Shepherd Express
Pubdate: January 10, 2008
Author: Shepherd Express Staff
Section: Expresso

REMEMBERING DREYFUS

Last week we lost one of our most colorful politicians, former Gov. Lee Sherman Dreyfus. Although many commentators chose to focus on his red vest, tax refunds and populist style, readers around the globe got a different picture of a man they had probably never heard of before: Dreyfus as a champion of gay rights. According to the Associated Press headline reprinted around the world, "Former Wisconsin Gov. Lee Sherman Dreyfus dies at 81; signed first statewide gay rights law." Although local news reports tended to downplay that historic move, we're grateful to the AP reporter, Scott Bauer, for his description of the former guv.

Medical marijuana supporters reminded us that Dreyfus signed another landmark bill into law, the Therapeutic Cannabis Research Act, in 1982. According to the organization Is My Medicine Legal Yet? (IMMLY), the law didn't change much, since it relied on the federal government for a supply of medical marijuana. IMMLY is calling on the current governor, Jim Doyle, and the state Legislature, to pass the Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act, which is stalled in the Assembly Health and Health Care Reform Committee, chaired by state Rep. Leah Vukmir (R-Wauwatosa). The bill would allow certain individuals to use medical marijuana for health reasons.

Posted by Gary at 11:39 AM | Comments (0)

January 17, 2008

State of State Patients Vigil at Jan. 23 State of the State Address @ Capitol

Posted by Gary Storck
Thursday, January 17, 2008

State medical cannabis supporters are not prepared to see Assembly Bill 550, the Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act, go down without a fight. To that end, sick and dying Wisconsin patients and supporters will be making our way to the Capitol next Wednesday evening, Jan. 23, to hold a silent vigil outside the State of the State Address, per below...

State of the State Address medical cannabis vigil Wed. Jan. 23 @ Capitol after 5:30 pm

Dear Wisconsin medical cannabis supporters,

On Wednesday Jan. 23, 2008 at 7 pm, Governor Jim Doyle will be delivering his "State of the State" Address in the State Capitol's Assembly Chambers to the full legislature, most ranking state government officials and the press.

Beginning at 5:30 pm, medical marijuana activists and supporters will be holding a vigil outside the Assembly Chambers to dramatize the urgent need for legal access to medical cannabis for sick and dying Wisconsinites, and to call attention to Assembly Bill 550, the Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act, currently stalled in committee. Through this vigil, patients hope to send state lawmakers and Gov. Doyle the message that the state of state patients is not good, and that AB 550 needs to be passed and signed this session, because patients need medical cannabis today, and many will not live until next session.

Please join Jacki Rickert, myself and other Wisconsin patients and supporters Wednesday evening at the Capitol. Small signs are allowed and will be provided.

Gary Storck
IMMLY, Madison/WI NORML


Posted by Gary at 12:05 AM | Comments (0)

January 11, 2008

Green Bay Press Gazette: Guest Column: State medical marijuana law remains elusive

Posted by Gary Storck
Friday, Jan. 11, 2008

A different version of my letter about the late WI Gov. Lee Sherman Dreyfus and medical cannabis, and the current situation, was published in the Green Bay Press Gazette today as a guest column.

Hopefully this will inspire some activism up in the Green Bay area and Fox Valley area. Medical cannabis supporters need to pull out all the stops. Please contact your legislators, the Assembly Speaker and GOP Majority Leader and Rep. Vukmir and demand the bill see action this session. To find out who represents you click here.
--------
Newshawk: Is My Medicine Legal YET? www.immly.org
Source: Green Bay Press Gazette
Pubdate: January 11, 2008
Author: Gary Storck Guest commentary

GUEST COLUMN: STATE MEDICAL MARIJUANA LAW REMAINS ELUSIVE

I was sorry to read of the passing of former Wisconsin Gov. Lee Sherman Dreyfus. Gov. Dreyfus signed Wisconsin's first medical marijuana bill into law April 19, 1982. As a glaucoma patient fighting each day to save my precious eyesight, I had already been using cannabis for 10 years at that time, and had lobbied for the bill.

The Therapeutic Cannabis Research Act passed both houses easily, the Assembly 77-19 and the Senate 32-1. Similar legislation was passed in more than two-thirds of U.S. states. Unfortunately, these bills were written with the expectation that the federal government would supply the program's medical marijuana. With federal authorities unwilling to supply marijuana to sick and dying U.S. citizens, the law became symbolic.

While Dreyfus remained a supporter of medical marijuana in his later years, even writing about it, many of the Republican legislators who followed him in state government have failed to honor his compassionate vision by blocking medical marijuana legislation each time it is introduced. This session, the Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act is awaiting action in the Assembly's Health and Healthcare Reform committee. So far, committee Chairwoman Rep. Leah Vukmir, R-Wauwatosa, a nurse, has stated the bill will not receive a hearing. If the bill does not receive a hearing soon, it will die in committee like previous attempts dating more than a decade.

Polling has established popular support for medical marijuana exceeds 80 percent in Wisconsin. As an advocate for medical cannabis, I constantly receive calls from patients and family members who indicate there is a crisis in pain management in our state. I know the good folks who call me and tell me about their pain represent only the tip of the iceberg.

Memo to the GOP leadership: The sick and dying are not your enemy. I get calls from Republicans, too. Serious illness knows no party affiliation.

Let's get this done, this session, in honor of the memory of a man ahead of his time, Gov. Lee Sherman Dreyfus, who did his best to try to help patients and families with nowhere to turn, as well as the thousands and thousands of Wisconsinites who died in pain and those still suffering and waiting for state lawmakers to finally do the right thing.

Please make passage of AB 550, the Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act, a true priority when the Legislature reconvenes Jan. 15.

Gary Storck of Madison is a longtime medical marijuana patient and advocate. He serves as director of communications of Is My Medicine Legal YET? (www.immly.org) and co-founded the Madison and Wisconsin chapters of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML).

Posted by Gary at 10:03 AM | Comments (0)

January 09, 2008

Wisconsin State Journal OPED: 'Reefer Madness' or a good start?

Posted by Gary Storck
Wednesday, January 9, 2008

How great to find this pro-cannabis law reform OPED from Marureen Martin. a lawyer and a senior fellow for legal affairs at The Heartland Institute in Chicago, in today's WI State Journal! Thanks to Mary P. for the heads up!

Newshawk: Madison NORML www.madisonnorml.org
Source: Wisconsin State Journal
Pubdate: January 8, 2008
Author: Maureen Martin

'REEFER MADNESS' OR A GOOD START?

The Waukesha County Board voted recently -- and nearly unanimously -- to treat possession of marijuana by first-time offenders as a ticketed traffic-like offense rather than a crime.

Has "Reefer Madness " struck Waukesha County? The answer may be yes, but only in the sense its decriminalization of marijuana possession doesn 't go far enough. It is, however, a good start.

In 2003, 26,494 persons were arrested in Wisconsin statewide for drug-related crimes, according to the Wisconsin Office of Justice Assistance. Of this number, 20,245 were arrested for drug possession. Almost 75 percent of those (14,097) were arrested for possession of marijuana.

Statewide, the average rates of marijuana arrests per 100,000 population dwarfed arrests for possession of other drugs for 2001-03, OJA data disclosed.

Nationally, in 2005, the Federal Bureau of Investigation reported some 786,545 persons were arrested for marijuana violations, of which 696,074 were arrested for possession of marijuana.

At the same time, jail and prison incarceration rates for prisoners convicted of non-violent drug crimes and in need of substance abuse counseling were skyrocketing in Wisconsin.

A 2006 study by Justice Strategies and supported by state Sen. Carol Roessler, R-Oshkosh, and state Rep. Garey Bies, R-Sister Bay, among others, found the state spent $83 million imprisoning such offenders, when drug treatment services could have been provided at a fraction of the cost.

And the real numbers may be even higher.

"Much of the behavior that packs Wisconsin 's prisons is rooted in drug and alcohol abuse, " the report states. "As one judge put it, Drugs drive all our crime, the whole caseload. The economics of the whole criminal justice system here is driven by addiction. ' " Overall, $43 million in annual savings would result from providing treatment in lieu of incarceration, the report concludes.

And here 's why, according to George Melloan, retired deputy editor of The Wall Street Journal. Melloan wrote in 2006 that expenditures for drug prohibition limit supplies and drive prices up, predictably enough. The United States spends $50 billion at all levels of government for drug interdiction, according to Melloan, not counting the costs of expanded prisons.

"The more the U.S. spends on interdiction, the more incentive it creates for taking the risk of running drugs. "

Don 't ask those on the front lines of the war on drugs to save costs, he says.

"An army of government employees now makes a living from the drug laws and has a rather conflictive interest in claiming both that the drug laws are working and that more money is needed. "

So one question for the taxpaying public, according to Melloan, is whether the use of marijuana should be legalized or decriminalized.

The answer should be "yes " for both questions, and Waukesha County has moved in the right direction.

Martin is a lawyer and a senior fellow for legal affairs at The Heartland Institute in Chicago.

Posted by Gary at 09:01 PM | Comments (0)

January 08, 2008

Letter: Capital Times: Dreyfus supported medical marijuana; today's pols should too

Posted by Gary Storck
Tuesday, January 8, 2008

Without further action, Assembly Bill 550, The Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act, will die in Rep. Leah Vukmir's Assembly Health and Healthcare Reform Committee on March 13, 2008, just 65 days from today.

At this point, the bill's fate is in the hands of Assembly Speaker Mike Huebsch (R-West Salem), Assembly GOP Majority Leader Jeff Fitzgerald, Assembly Health and Healthcare Reform Committee chair Rep. Leah Vukmir (R-Wauwatosa) and Assembly Health and Healthcare Reform Committee vice chair Terry Moulton (R-Chippewa Falls).

If you are a constituent of any of these representatives, please call their office and request AB 550, the Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act receive a hearing. Assembly Speaker Huebsch has the power to pull AB 550 from Rep. Vukmir's committee and assign it to the Assembly Public Health Committee, chaired by Rep. J.A. "Doc" Hines (R-Oxford), who has promised to hold a hearing. If you are a constituent of Rep, Hines, please call and ask that he request that AB 550 be reassigned to his committee so it can receive a public hearing.

Rep. Mike Huebsch (R-West Salem)
Speaker iof the Wisconsin Assembly
94th Assembly District
Telephone (608) 266-3387 Or (888) 534-0094
District Telephone (608) 786-3512
Email Rep.Huebsch@legis.wisconsin.gov

Rep. Jeff Fitzgerald (R-Horicon)
Republican Assembly Majority Leader
39th Assembly District
Telephone (608) 266-2401
District Telephone (920) 485-0586
Email Rep.Fitzgerald@legis.wisconsin.gov

Rep. Leah Vukmir (R-Wauwatosa)
14th Assembly District
chair, Assembly Health & Healthcare Reform Committee
Telephone (608) 266-9180
Email Rep.Vukmir@legis.wisconsin.gov

Rep. Terry Moulton (R-Chippewa Falls)
68th Assembly District
vice-chair, Assembly Health & Healthcare Reform Committee
Telephone (608) 266-9172
Email Rep.Moulton@legis.wisconsin.gov

Rep. J.A. Hines (R-Oxford)
42nd Assembly District
chair, Assembly Public Health Committee
Telephone (608) 266-7746 Or (888) 534-0042
District Telephone (608) 586-5999
Email Rep.Hines@legis.wisconsin.gov
-----------------------------------

Source: Capital Times
Pubdate: January 8, 2008
Author: Gary Storck

DREYFUS SUPPORTED MEDICAL MARIJUANA; TODAY'S POLS SHOULD TOO

Dear Editor: I was sorry to read of the passing of former Wisconsin Gov. Lee Sherman Dreyfus. Dreyfus signed Wisconsin's first medical marijuana bill into law on April 19, 1982.

As a glaucoma patient fighting each day to save my precious eyesight, I had been using cannabis for 10 years and had lobbied for the bill. The Therapeutic Cannabis Research Act passed both houses easily. Similar legislation was passed in more than two-thirds of U.S. states.

Unfortunately, these bills were written with the expectation that the federal government would supply the program's medical marijuana. With federal authorities unwilling to supply marijuana to sick and dying U.S. citizens, the law became symbolic.

While Dreyfus remained a supporter of medical marijuana in his later years, many of the Republican legislators who followed him in state government have blocked medical marijuana legislation.

This session, the Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act is awaiting action in the Assembly's Health and Healthcare Reform Committee. Chair Leah Vukmir, R-Wauwatosa, a nurse, has stated that the bill will not receive a hearing. If the bill does not receive a hearing soon, it will die in committee like previous attempts dating back more than a decade.

Polling has established that popular support for medical marijuana exceeds 80 percent in Wisconsin. As an advocate for medical cannabis, I constantly receive calls from patients and family members who indicate there is a crisis in pain management in our state. I know the good folks who call me represent only the tip of the iceberg.

Memo to the GOP leadership: The sick and dying are not your enemy. I get calls from Republicans too. Let's get this done, this session, in honor of the memory of not only a man ahead of his time, Gov. Lee Sherman Dreyfus, but also the thousands of Wisconsinites who died in pain. Please make passage of the Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act a true priority when the Legislature reconvenes Jan. 15!

Gary Storck, Is My Medicine Legal YET?, Madison


Posted by Gary at 10:27 AM | Comments (0)

January 05, 2008

Former WI Gov. Lee Sherman Dreyfus 2002 Column: Wisconsin Should Take Lead In Marijuana Research

Posted by Gary Storck
Saturday, Jan. 5, 2008

The late WI Gov. Lee Sherman Dreyfus was a wise man. Here is a column he wrote back in 2002, urging the legislature to fund a study of medical marijuana, to not only settle any disputes as to its medical value but also provide opportunities for the state and its citizens to benefit both medically and economically.

I guess opponents in the legislature did not do that because if they had, they would by now have to admit it works. Having not done so, they can still trot out that tired excuse in 2008 so more patients die without legal access to this option. Of course, there was sufficient evidence long before 2002. Still, Lee Sherman Dreyfus showed he could learn and evolved his position accordingly. Too bad his advice was not taken.

Pubdate: Thu, 10 Jan 2002
Source: Waukesha Freeman (WI)
Copyright: 2002 The Waukesha Freeman
Contact: (262) 542-8259
Details: http://www.mapinc.org/media/770
Author: Lee Sherman Dreyfus
Note: Lee Sherman Dreyfus is a former Wisconsin governor who lives in
Waukesha. His column runs Thursdays in the Freeman.

WISCONSIN SHOULD TAKE LEAD IN MARIJUANA RESEARCH

With my initials, L.S.D., I have been the butt of jokes and jibes for most of my adult life. In fairness to my mother, who gave me these infamous initials, I must add that she gave birth to me 11 years before the hallucinogenic drug was invented. LSD, heroin, cocaine, ecstasy or marijuana simply were not used or available in my pre-World War II high school.

However, 1942 and 2002 are very different years when it comes to sex, drugs and all sorts of risky behaviors. The most common illicit drug in use now is marijuana, or "pot." The Latin name for the plant is cannabis. Today it is federally illegal to grow, sell or smoke marijuana. Regulation of this drug is established by the Food and Drug Administration and enforcement is carried out by the Drug Enforcement Agency.

Two Democratic representatives and one Republican have introduced a bill to legalize some use of pot. This bill, like its predecessors, is not a blanket legalization of cannabis, but authorizes physicians to prescribe its use to treat disease or relieve pain and suffering for seriously or terminally ill patients.

The applicable law currently on the books here in Wisconsin was actually signed by me in 1982. My memory is hazy, but I remember the intent was to give physicians some leeway in treating their patients and to promote further research. A few years later, California passed Proposition 215, which allowed people to grow their own pot if they needed it medically. Leave it to California!

Medical marijuana "clubs" soon came into being and were clearly fronts for people who wished to use pot as a recreational drug. This brought the Supreme Court into the act, and in 1994, the court ruled that marijuana was a schedule I drug, which is defined legally as highly addictive and of no medical usefulness. That last phrase is one where, in my opinion, the learned justices over-reached. I don't think we know that!

The DEA says that is true, but an enforcement agency should not be our guide relative to medical possibilities. Here in Wisconsin we have a world-class research university, one that has conducted clinical studies in biochemistry for more than a century. The Wisconsin Idea has always urged our Legislature to seek help in its decision-making from the other end of State Street.

Here's an opportunity for Wisconsin to again make a great contribution to the nation. Our Legislature should take the lead to fund research on the medical use of marijuana, and get FDA and DEA regulations set aside so the university can carry out a controlled, legitimate and credible clinical study in this matter. Our state's medical association would support that as well as our state's nursing association. They are already on record.

It isn't simply a question of whether or not there are medical benefits. Such a study could also tell us if the risks outweigh the benefits. The first rule of medicine is "Primum non nocere," which translates to "First, do no harm." If we find this substance has substantial medical benefits, the next step would be for pharmaceutical companies to produce it in a pill or liquid form so as to control dosage and purity.

The Legislature has an opportunity here to help our great university research faculty to provide this nation with definitive information about a substance used at least once by 87 million Americans. But please don't tell the DEA that a former governor with the initials L.S.D. is supporting this.

URL: http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v02.n073.a03.html

Posted by Gary at 04:55 PM | Comments (0)

January 03, 2008

RELEASE: IMMLY: Mourns Passing Of Former Wi Gov. Lee Sherman Dreyfus Who Signed Wisconsin's First Medical Marijuana Bill In 1982

Posted by Gary Storck
Thursday, January 3, 2008

My first post of the new year is this press release IMMLY issued today in reaction to the passing of former Wisconsin Gov. Lee Sherman Dreyfus.

I first knew Lee Sherman Dreyfus as a student at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point in 1975-76, where he was the chancellor. Later, lobbying for medcal marijuana legislation, we exchanged correspondence regarding the bill. I last saw him at current Gov. Jim Doyle's first inaugration in January 2003.

For immediate release Thursday, January 03, 2008

IS MY MEDICINE LEGAL YET?: MOURNS PASSING OF FORMER WI GOV. LEE SHERMAN DREYFUS WHO SIGNED WISCONSIN'S FIRST MEDICAL MARIJUANA BILL IN 1982

Mondovi & Madison - Former Wisconsin Gov. Lee Sherman Dreyfus was a true leader and a governor who put Wisconsinites ahead of partisan politics by signing Wisconsin's Therapeutic Cannabis Research Act into law on April 19, 1982. The legislation had easily passed both houses with broad bipartisan support in 1981, passing the Assembly by 77-19 and the Senate by 32-1. Unfortunately, the bill relied on the federal government supplying medical marijuana, which they refused to do and this effort became symbolic.

We call upon the Wisconsin State Legislature and Governor to help finish former Gov. Dreyfus' legacy of compassion and bipartisanship by working to pass Assembly Bill 550, the Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act, this session. Currently AB 550 is stalled and awaiting action in the Assembly Health and Healthcare Reform committee. With time remaining to pass this critical legislation quickly running out, it is essential that state lawmakers act now so patients who need medical cannabis today gain access as soon as possible.

Is My Medicine Legal YET? is a Mondovi and Madison based grass roots patient and caregiver organization dedicated to advancing public education about the medicinal benefits of cannabis. For further information contact Jacki Rickert at 715.926.4950 or Gary Storck at 608.241.8922 or visit the IMMLY website at www.immly.org.

-30-

Posted by Gary at 12:09 PM | Comments (0)