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October 18, 2005

Recap of 35th Annual Great Midwest Marijuana Harvest Festival

Posted by Gary Storck
October 18, 2005

The 35th Annual Great Midwest Marijuana Harvest Festival was a rousing success this year, as warm temperatures and a great lineup of bands and speakers attracted many to the weekend's events.

This year's festival also attracted a lot of positive media coverage in not only the print media, but also on radio and television.

Here is a list of some of the articles about Harvest Fest 2005:

Medical Marijuana Advocates Rally
They Expect A Bill To Be Introduced Legalizing Its Prescribed Use In Wisconsin

Read article: click here
Wisconsin State Journal
Sunday, Oct. 2, 2005
Page 1D
(article included two photos, one of an event attendee and one of longtime event organizer Ben Masel.)

Harvest Fest Gathers Annual Supporters
Read article: click here
Badger Herald
Monday, October 3, 2005

Marijuana Rally Speakers Demand Decriminalization
Read article: click here
Daily Cardinal
Monday, October 3, 2005

Hundreds Turn Out For Harvest Fest
Read article: click here
Core Weekly
Thursday, October 6, 2005
(Article accompanied by by 7 x 7 inch color photo captioned: "Several hundred people march up State St. to the Capitol Square Sunday, October 2 in support of marijuana reform.)

State Bill Could Legalize Medical Marijuana
Read article: click here
Daily Cardinal
Tuesday, October 4, 2005

Posted by Gary at 11:47 AM | Comments (0)

October 17, 2005

Mother Jones: An Interview With Lester Grinspoon, M.D.

Posted by Gary Storck
October 17, 2005

Read entire article at Mother Jones click here

Gary Greenberg October 17 , 2005

Gary Greenberg, a Mother Jones contributing writer, is a psychotherapist and professor of psychology, and the author of "Respectable Reefer," in the November/December issue of the magazine. Lester Grinspoon, M.D., is associate professor emeritus of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and the author of Marijuana Reconsidered.

LG: Sativex is the kind of thing I was concerned about when I first spoke of the concept of pharmaceuticalization in 1985 to describe Marinol. At the time the federal government was under a lot of pressure to look at the medical uses of marijuana. So the government supported this little company Unimed to create Marinol, which is simply synthetic THC [tetrahyrdrocannabinol], which is identical to the THC that you find in cannabis. But that THC they put into Schedule II -- it’s so ridiculous! So Unimed comes out with it. It was very expensive, and I’ll tell you Gary, I have yet to have a patient or to hear from a patient who thinks Marinol is as good as whole smoked herbal marijuana. With Sativex, Geoffrey Guy went to the home office and said in effect, “Look, everybody knows that cannabis has medicinal utilities,” and the British government, just like the U.S. government, was being pressed to do something about it. He then said, “I have the plans for a product which will deliver all the medical capacities of cannabis, but at the same time not impose on the medical user the two most frightful things about cannabis -- the high and the pulmonary effect.” To me, that was based on a deception because we know now that the pulmonary problems are minimal. As for the high, I don’t believe that the high is a big problem in people with Crone’s Disease or Multiple Sclerosis, who feel better when they smoke cannabis—that’s probably a function of the anti-depressant effect of this substance. What’s the problem with that? Secondly I question whether one can, in all instances where cannabis is useful as medicine, bring that utility in below the level at which one gets some degree of a psychoactive effect.

GG: G.W. [Pharmaceuticals] claims that people who use this inhaler titrate to the point that they feel relief from their symptoms—which is MS pain or spasticity—don’t get intoxicated. What do you think about that?

LG: Well, if you can get relief from the spasticity without getting a high, then you could do the same with the smoked stuff. It’s much easier to titrate when you’re using the pulmonary system than when you’re using the sublingual [under the tongue] or oral system. You can feel it within seconds, whereas orally -- that is if you swallow it -- it’s going take an hour and a half. You take it sublingually, it’s maybe 15 minutes. It’s faster than oral. But it’s nowhere near as fast as smoking it. That to me is one of the great advantages of smoking cannabis -- that the patient can have control. He can get just the right amount for his symptoms. You are not going be able to titrate it for a while if it’s going to take you 15-20 minutes to get an effect.

GG: G.W. claims that every patient has his own learning curve, so you figure out “Oh that time I took too much or this time I didn’t take enough” and eventually know exactly how much to take. The advantage of the sublingual preparation is that they’ve managed to make each spray contain a whole lot less THC than even one puff on a joint.

LG: But the same thing can be done with marijuana if you know what the potency is.

Read the rest of article click here

Posted by Gary at 03:53 PM | Comments (0)

October 11, 2005

Bipartisan Medical Marijuana Bill introduced in Wisconsin

Posted by Gary Storck
October 11, 2005

Bipartisan medical marijuana legislation was introduced today in the Wisconsin Legislature. AB-740 was sponsored by Representative Gregg Underheim and cosponsored by a bipartisan group of lawmakers: Assembly Representatives Boyle, Berceau, Gronemus, Zepnick, Black, Sherman, Pocan, Pope-Roberts, Hahn, Wood, Musser, Owens, Grigsby and Parisi and Senator Carpenter.

To read the bill or the bill history, click here

Posted by Gary at 10:04 AM | Comments (0)

October 02, 2005

Wisconsin State Journal: Medical marijuana advocates rally

Posted by Gary Storck
Sunday, October 2, 2005

The Wisconsin State Journal carried a long article with two photos in Sunday's edition on the front page of the Local section. Read the article click here or click here

Posted by Gary at 11:24 AM | Comments (0)